An analysis of the poem robert frost

Viewing a choice as a fork in a path, it becomes clear that we must choose one direction or another, but not both. As this person stands looking at the two options, he is weighing the pros and cons in a quiet, studied manner.

Summary and Analysis of the Poem

The final question suggests that this design is dark in nature, intended to appall, that is, shock and nauseate.

Would that be possible. Simile In the third line the moth is likened to a piece of cloth and also in the eighth line, a paper kite. Stanza 2 Summary In this second stanza, lines six through eight: They eventually forecast his downfall, undermining the concept of freewill, implying that there is some grand design behind all life.

He wants to travel both, and is "sorry" he cannot, but this is physically impossible. But you yourself can resurrect it from zombie-hood by reading it—not with imagination, even, but simply with accuracy.

All the speaker knows is that he prefers the road less travelled, perhaps because he enjoys solitude and believes that to be important.

And dead wings carried like a paper kite. There where it is we do not need the wall: We experience this literally: The speaker sees white, a freak of nature, because the actual heal-all is blue, the color of revelation. This technique is used a lot in the book of Psalms from the bible.

We basically find ourselves observing a very important moment, where he has to make a decision that is evidently difficult for him. It's fat, well fed, dimpled like a baby, and sits on a flower - white against white. Isn't it Where there are cows.

I found a dimpled spider, fat and white, The stresses come right after the non-stressed syllables so creating a kind of lilt. It appears most notably in John 7: The speaker wants to put a notion into the head of his neighbor, to ask him to explain why is it good walls make good neighbors, but in the end says nothing.

I see him there Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed. The old question of whether there is design is idle. So, it is possible to imagine Frost the poet going out one day and observing the spider with the moth on the flower and being inspired to create his sonnet, having had inspiration from the writings of William James.

Fire and ice appear in the title and are repeated twice in the poem. This person, faced with an important conscious decision, chose the least popular, the path of most resistance. And both the morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Ultimately, the reader is left to make up their own mind about the emotional state of the speaker at the end.

But who knows what the future holds down the road. Analysis This last stanza really highlights the nature of our regrets. Which way will you go. And how come the spider got to just the right height in time and space.

All the speaker knows is that he prefers the road less travelled, perhaps because he enjoys solitude and believes that to be important. Robert Frost wrote this poem to highlight a trait of, and poke fun at, his friend Edward Thomas, an English-Welsh poet, who, when out walking with Frost in England would often regret not having taken a different path.

Robert Frost in | Source Robert Frost's Mending Wall Written inMending Wall is a poem in blank verse that remains relevant for these uncertain times. Robert Frost: Poems study guide contains a biography of poet Robert Frost, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis of his major poems.

About Robert Frost: Poems. Feb 17,  · "The Road Not Taken" is an ambiguous poem that allows the reader to think about choices in life, whether to go with the mainstream or go it alone.

If life is a journey, this poem highlights those times in life when a decision has to be tsfutbol.coms: 8. Robert Frost was a famous American modernist poet. This lesson covers the elements that make Frost's poetry modernist and analyzes his most famous.

A Question by Robert Frost. Robert Frost. A Question by Robert Frost. Prev Article Next Article. According to Shakespeare, “brevity is the soul of wit.” According to a popular expression, “slow and steady wins the race.” Get more Poetry Analysis like this in your inbox.

Analysis of Poem

Subscribe to our mailing list and get new poetry analysis. Robert Frost: Poems study guide contains a biography of poet Robert Frost, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis of his major poems.

An analysis of the poem robert frost
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Analysis of Poem "Design" by Robert Frost | LetterPile